Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review – ‘Can Art Stop a Bullet’

William Kelly, artist and peace activist, has been called the ‘moral conscience’ of Australian Art. For him there’s no line between life and art. Can Art Stop a Bullet is a documentary about the man himself and centered around an art piece he’s making for the State Library of Victoria. The film explores the connections between […]

Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review – ‘Paradise Without People’

TIME magazine produced their first feature documentary with ‘Paradise Without People‘, in which we follow two Syrian women, at the height of Europe’s refugee crisis, with the same dream: to raise their children away from war. Directed by Emmy-nominated journalist Francesca Trianni, the film takes unexpected turns while we get a glimpse at the lives […]

Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review – ‘Hamtramck, USA’

Through the exploration of daily life and democracy, ‘Hamtramck, USA‘ examines the benefits and tensions of multiculturalism. Kicking the film off with a typical all American theme song, we take a trip down memory lane while a series of video clips and photographs of the small Michigan-city, grace the screen. Formerly inhabited by almost solely […]

Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review – ‘Batman and Me’

Tim Burton’s ‘Batman‘ released June 1989, grossed a whopping $411 million at the worldwide box office, while its associated merchandise generated over a billion USD. After a childhood memory leads to a Google search for Batman slime, Australian filmmaker Michael Wayne (not related to Bruce Wayne aka The Dark Knight himself, FYI) visits a Batman-merchandise […]

Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review – ‘Descent’

Kiki Bosch is a professional ice freediver from the Netherlands; she dives into the coldest waters on the planet on one breath without a wetsuit, from the iceberg fjords of Greenland to the frozen lakes of Finland. Sounds cool, but Nays Baghai‘s documentary starts of with a trigger warning – viewer discretion is advised. After […]

Doc Edge Festival Review – ‘Bare’

Dance documentary Bare follows a choreographer and his team going through a process of auditions, rehearsals and eventually a premiere. The journey reveals internal artistic conflicts between the dancers and their personal challenges during the several months of creating the performance. Closeups of male skin and non-stop graphic nudity show how vulnerable these men can […]

Doc Edge Festival Review – ‘Meat The Future’

Silicon Valley, 2016. Fortune.com releases an article about cardiologist turned innovator, Uma Valeti. He’s able to make a meatball with new technology, fully grown from real cow and pig cells, without slaughtering a living creature. The cells take about 14 to 21 days to mature in a bioreactor and the price for just a pound […]

Doc Edge Festival Review – ‘A Chef’s Voyage’

One of the first things we see on screen is a stack of Michelin-guides, while food critic and author, Christine Muhlke explains to us what Michelin-stars really are. They’re basically the culinary Olympic medals and very hard to obtain. Once you get a star, you strive for another and try to keep the one you […]

Doc Edge Festival Review – ‘The Prophet and the Space Aliens’

What is the difference between a cult and a religion? And why do some of us believe a man was able to part the sea in half to create a path, but can’t believe the story about a man who received a prophecy from extraterrestrials? After receiving a mysterious invitation from the Raelians to accept […]

Netflix Review – ‘Jeffrey Epstein: Filthy Rich’

Opening your four-part docuseries with a slide that states “The following series contains graphic descriptions of sexual abuse involving minors, which may be disturbing for some viewers.”, sets the tone for what’s about to unfold. We then cut to an interrogation in 2012, where Epstein quickly uses his right to plead the Fifth Amendment to […]